To start out this next post, I'm going to introduce one of my favorite and most time-consuming things in my life right now: my major! Some of the first few comments from people who heard that I was majoring in Biodiversity and Conservation were as follows: "Soo...you're a treehugger?..." "Are you like a hippie or something?..."

Heyy guys! I’m super excited because I got more than 400 different visitors on my first post. To start out this next post, I’m going to introduce one of my favorite and most time-consuming things in my life right now: my major!

Some of the first few comments from people who heard that I was majoring in Biodiversity and Conservation were as follows:

"Soo...you're a treehugger?..."

"Are you like a hippie or something?..."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and more often than not,

"Wait what? Could you repeat that?"

I continue to explain that essentially, it’s Conservation Biology. And then the resounding question is always asked, “So what do you actually want to do with that?”

If I could use gifs in everyday life, this is how I would answer them:

What my mom thinks I want to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What my Professors think I want to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I actually want to do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From a young age, I’ve always loved going on adventures outside. Wisconsin has lakes and ponds literally everywhere, so it gave great opportunities for exploring forests and rivers right outside my home while I was growing up. Some of my favorite memories growing up include riding on bike trails through miles of forest and trying to catch fish in the rivers that were just minutes from my home in Wisconsin. I loved looking for fish that were frozen into the top layers of ponds right next to my high school.

Which brings up a good story…

The only time I got in trouble with the police growing up was because I was looking for fish in a frozen pond! Haha (They were scared my friend and I were gonna fall through the ice, but I’m pretty sure they were just new in town because that pond was MAYBE 2-3 feet deep at most) It’s still awesome to go searching for frozen fish, just be careful not to do it if the ice is melting or not thick enough to hold you…. (Which is a superpower I possess being from Wisconsin don’t cha know)

Anyway….

I’ve always known I wanted to study in the life sciences because of a few reasons. One, I don’t want to spend a large portion of my time at a job working on the computer. While a few hours is alright, 8 hours a day for years would kill me because (and this leads into number two) I love being outside. I’m pretty sure any job that deals with nature in some way and gets me outside occasionally would make me soo happy. 🙂

The last and ultimate reason is people underestimate how much the climate and nature actually impact us. When people shop at a grocery store, they don’t think where the chopped pieces of chicken or wide variety of vegetables are sourced from. Our society has forgotten where we came from and as a result we don’t care about what is happening to those lands or seas. If we can’t see the coral being bleached due to changing sea surface temperatures, and we are still getting fish from the store like normal, why should we care?

We get many of our medicines that cure or treat diseases from plants and even sea life. If forests are just chopped down, or coral reefs die, many future cures or medicines that would help would be erased.

Climate and nature has a serious impact on us. When we damage it the effects may not come immediately, but the damage will be seen in the future. That is why protecting the biodiversity of the earth is so important. Even if you aren’t a biology or biodiversity major, protecting our resources should be a major priority to all.